SlowFoodItalyLogo

The new 2015 list of awards/recognition for Italian Olive Oils has been released by Slow Food in Italy. Olio2go carries many of farms included in the book.

We carry 12 of the top olive oils recognized by Slow Food Italy. These are estate bottled and sealed. We import in bottles at great expense (glass is heavy!), and feel that the consumer should receive the oil as it left the farm (not passed from tank to tank to bottle).

The full top awards list can be seen here:

SlowFood2015Awards

Chiocciole

Abruzzo, Trappeto di Caprafico

Emilia-Romagna, Tenuta Pennita (coming soon)

Lazio, Colli Etruschi (coming soon)

Sicilia, Biologica Titone

Oli Slow

Sicilia, Biologica Titone

Sicilia, Villa Zottopera Bio

Toscana, Fonte di Foiano 1979 (coming soon)

Toscana, Fonte di Foiano, Frantoio (coming soon)

Grandi Oli

Puglia, DeCarlo Torre di Mossa

Sicilia, Cutrera Primo DOP

Toscana, Franci Olivastra Seggianese (coming soon)

Umbria, Marfuga L’affiorante

All can be purchased at Olio2go.com. We ship promptly within the U.S. and Canada.

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Click to Listen: Taste Matters Episode with Nancy Harmon Jenkins (#125)

We’ve just discovered the Heritage Radio Network and enjoyed listening to this superb interview with Nancy Harmon Jenkins. The interview covers many important topics — Olive Oil is covered in the first 11 minutes — including our central focus on Italian Olive Oil. The Mediterranean Diet, lifestyle, cooking with olive oil, Slow Food, and ancient grains (like farro) are included. Listen to Nancy and then visit Olio2go for Italy’s Finest Olive Oil.

So often at Olio2go, we’re asked pressing questions about olive oil. We have a FAQ and you can read it here.

Olive Trees on a Warm Winter Day

Olive Trees on a Warm Winter Day

These are the Quick Notes.

The earlier the olives are harvested, the less oil they yield. That early oil tends to have peppery characteristics from the “verge of ripeness” of the olives. Early harvested olives yield lower acidity levels than later harvested olives. The early harvested oils also hold the highest levels of the beneficial polyphenols — and associated health benefits.

The early harvest, early bottled, quick shipped olive oils are bottled as Novello oils. We’re planning to carry a half dozen this year. It’s likely that we’ll have three “brands” by early December. Those will be Olio Verde Novello, Tenuta di Capezzana Olio Nuovo, and Canonica Verde Novello. Last year, we had early shipments of Marfuga L’affiorante, Santisi Novello, and Olio Beato Organic New Harvest. The links here relate to the current products. The novellos will be listed on our web site as they become available.

Crossing borders, I like to think of the Novello oils as wine fans think of Beaujolais. It’s the first of the season and definitely worth celebrating.

When do they harvest?

We’re eagerly awaiting news of the harvest. Azienda del Carmine (home of the famed Olio del Carmine and Ascolana) has shared that they are planning to begin the harvest around 15 October. They have even invited our customers to visit the estate to share in the harvest. From Liguria to Sicily, the harvest will take place between October and January, based on the micro-climates of each hillside. Frost is an enemy to the process so those in the coldest microclimates will begin the harvests first, to ensure the crop is harvested before it is “too late”.

And what does cold pressed mean?

In Italian, the phrase “spremitura a freddo” means cold pressed. Through the pressing process, the temperature is monitored to make sure that it does not increase (friction causes heat…) as an increase in temperature can affect the acidity level of the oil. Every Italian extra virgin olive oil is cold pressed.

And, with that, other work is pressing in!