SlowFoodItalyLogo

The new 2015 list of awards/recognition for Italian Olive Oils has been released by Slow Food in Italy. Olio2go carries many of farms included in the book.

We carry 12 of the top olive oils recognized by Slow Food Italy. These are estate bottled and sealed. We import in bottles at great expense (glass is heavy!), and feel that the consumer should receive the oil as it left the farm (not passed from tank to tank to bottle).

The full top awards list can be seen here:

SlowFood2015Awards

Chiocciole

Abruzzo, Trappeto di Caprafico

Emilia-Romagna, Tenuta Pennita (coming soon)

Lazio, Colli Etruschi (coming soon)

Sicilia, Biologica Titone

Oli Slow

Sicilia, Biologica Titone

Sicilia, Villa Zottopera Bio

Toscana, Fonte di Foiano 1979 (coming soon)

Toscana, Fonte di Foiano, Frantoio (coming soon)

Grandi Oli

Puglia, DeCarlo Torre di Mossa

Sicilia, Cutrera Primo DOP

Toscana, Franci Olivastra Seggianese (coming soon)

Umbria, Marfuga L’affiorante

All can be purchased at Olio2go.com. We ship promptly within the U.S. and Canada.

OC2015_collageIn this most difficult harvest year, the awards have commenced. It seems that the producers have self-selected and self-nominated with great restraint. Those who were confident of their olive oils submitted them to the major competitions. At Trieste, the number of submissions was down and quality was awarded.

Let’s take a look at the notable awards from Olio Capitale, March 7-10, 2015 in Trieste. (Awards List Here).

We’re highlighting the award winners (all 2014 harvest) available through Olio2go.com.

The highest award – Overall winner in the Intensely Fruity Category:

Categoria Fruttato Intenso

Azienda Agraria De Carlo: Olio Tenuta Torre di Mossa 2014
Puglia

Mention of Honor Giuria Ristoratori

Frantoi Cutrera Primo DOP Monti Iblei 2014, Sicilia

Finalists – Fruttato Intenso

Società Agricola Fonte di Foiano S.S. Grand Cru 2014 Toscana– coming soon!
Azienda Agricola De Carlo Torre di Mossa 2014 Puglia – in stock!

Frantoi Cutrera Primo 2014 – D.O.P. Monti Iblei – Sicilia – in stock!

Semi Finalist – Fruttato Intenso

Tenute Librandi Monocultivar Nocellara del Belice Biologico – Vaccarizzo Albanese CS – 2014 coming soon!

RadarFlorenceSept2014

For three months now there have been stunning reports of the difficult, challenging, and horrible olive harvest in Italy. Decades have passed since such a crisis last occurred, and that, the Tuscan freeze of 1985, did not reach the broad geographical proportions of this one.

During the month of October, we learned of the losses on a daily basis. Each phone call and email told a tale of crop failures and weather issues. Few areas were immune. In general, windstorms, rain, a cool summer, and a hailstorm were the weather issues. A bug and a fungus took hold as well.

Videos of the 18 September 2014 hailstorm in Tuscany can be seen here and here.

As reported to us, the harvests in Sicily were early and small. Problems were noted from The Veneto to Puglia. Producers in Tuscany, Umbria, Marche, and Abruzzo piled on tales of woe.

Outstanding producers chose to bottle no oil in the fall of 2014: Tenuta di Capezzana, Poggio Etrusco, Avignonesi, Fattoria di Monti, Decimi, and others.  We were informed of difficulties among many others who have valiantly produced much smaller quantities than normal. And, need we mention price increases?

There is a human toll that goes far beyond the kitchen table. Families, including farm workers, and bottlers, have experienced reduced wages from the poor harvest. Quality olive oil will likely cost more than ever.

Remembering that there are always variations in characteristics for year to year, the 2014s we have tasted provide a remarkable testament to the skills of the producers. Aromatic, fresh, grassy, bitter, and spicy can all be found in our lucky bottles.

Jan2015Grp

We continue to remain optimistic as we have carefully sourced 30 selections so far this season. Our full line of new olive oils (many shown in photo) can be purchased here.

Frantoi Cutrera, Frescolio and Primo DOP

La Poderina Toscana Organic, Oro and Argento

Gianfranco Becchina’s Olio Verde Novello

Frescobaldi First Pressing

Titone Novello

Santisi Novello

Azienda del Carmine, Ascolana and Olio del Carmine

CantinArte OroPuro

di Giovanna (Gerbino Biologica)

Marfuga L’Affiorante 

Villa Zottopera Bio and Rosso

Fratelli Colletti

Fattoria Ramerino Primus and Cultivar Frantoio

Principe di Mascio, Novello and DOP

Quattrociocchi Olivastro

In the coming months we look forward to arrivals of many more selections from Italy, including favorites such as:

Olio Librandi

Centonze

Gargiulo Sorrentolio Venus

La Pennita, Alina

Castello del Trebbio

Badia a Coltibuono

Our challenge is to continue to bring in the best Italian extra virgin olive oil in quantities to carry us through to the 2015 harvest.

 

For more information on the topic of the 2014 olive harvest, we recommend the following clicks:

New York Times: Amid bugs, hail, floods…

Los Angeles Times: Europe Suffers Olive Oil Disaster

NPR: Olive Oil Producers in Crisis

PlanetaDOP_400There’s something fun about Planeta. It may be that customers recognize the olive oil logo, and immediately smile at the good memories associated with Planeta’s top quality wines from their estate in Sicily.

Olio2go has visited Planeta at their marvelous estate and we’ve also had the good fortune to meet with Penny in the States. We think the world of their top production of extra virgin olive oil (and wine too, but we don’t sell that!).

The availability of summer produce has driven the selection of Planeta DOP Val di Mazara as our choice for June for Olio2go’s Olive Oil of the Month Club. Salads of greens with leafy herbs, your favorite bruschetta, a platter of roasted vegetables… (we could go on for a bit here)….they are all richly enhanced by a healthy drizzle of Planeta.

Send an email to us for more information on Olio2go’s Olive Oil of the Month Club.

CastellodiBrolio_DM

Following on to our popular guest post on Wine and Olive Oil Tours from Pamela Sheldon Johns, we have even more ideas for Wine Touring throughout Italy.

If you are one who likes to plan everything to the smallest detail, you can do your homework in the US and then map out the wineries before leaving for Italy.  You will find that most wineries now have websites that list information about visits and tastings. The major wineries are very well organized.

For the important wineries, it is wise to reserve in advance to be sure that they will be open on the day you want, and someone will be available to translate in your language. Most DOC and DOCG wines have an informational organization that will list the wineries. Google the name of the wine you are interested in and the word consortium (or consorzio in Italian), and you should be able to find some contact info.

If you prefer someone to do the thinking for you, there are several excellent wine tour companies who will make all the arrangements for you.

Generally, olive oil tours are less common, so don’t expect the same structure as with wine.  Olio2Go can assist with contacting producers that are willing to give a tour, but it is best to check first.  Castello del Trebbio does both wine and olive oil tastings, and is located east of Florence.

Beginning at an enoteca is a good way to sample the region’s varieties and then formulate a plan a visit to the ones you really care about.  Most of the wine producing regions have a primary enoteca in the main town of the area.  Many of these carry both wine and oil to sample.

Some of our favorite wine tastings, tours, and enotecas (enoteche):

Tuscany

Avignonesi (must book in advance)

Badia a Coltibuono

Castello del Trebbio, Santa Brigida

Antinori (beautiful building). For a bit of history on Antinori opening to the public after 600 years, here’s an interesting article from Forbes.

Umbria

Marfuga (olive oil and other products), north of Spoleto

Gusto Umbrian Wine Tours, centered around Montefalco

Barberani (property and tasting room outside of town, enoteca in Orvieto)

Veneto

 Serego Alighieri, outside of Verona

 Enoteca “el loco” in Bardolino, on Lake Garda

Piemonte

Enoteca del Barolo, in Barolo

Enoteca Regionale del Barbaresco, Barbaresco

Travel Langhe (organized tours of the entire region)

Sardinia

Ask the staff at Su Barchile in Orosei for suggestions for a really special tour of this rugged area

Sicily

Planeta (Menfi and several other properties), wonderful people

Donna Fugata, Marsala, very impressive story and winery

DiGiovanna, near Marsala, home to Gerbino Olive Oil

Please let us know the highlights of your wine and olive oil visits!

 

Celebrate the Best Olive Oils from Italy!

AwardWinnersMarchApril2014

 

2014 Los Angeles Award Winners at Olio2go

2014 Los Angeles Award Winners at Olio2go

 

 

(Updated June 2014)

Just as with wine, there are international olive oil awards. The most recent award presentations can be found through the links below, and these very rare olive oils, available for purchase in the U.S. at Olio2go, are listed here.

BIOL International, March 2014

Olio Capitale: Annual Competition held in Trieste, March 2014

SOL/Vinitaly: SOL is held in together with Vinitaly in Verona, April 2014

New York International Olive Oil Competition, April 2014

Los Angeles International Olive, April 2014

 

The following award winners are currently available at Olio2go. All are extra virgin olive oils from the most recent harvest.

Centonze Extra Virgin Olive Oil

BIOL, Gold, Silver

Los Angeles: Gold Medal

Crudo Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Los Angeles: Silver Medal

DeCarlo Arcamone

BIOL, ExtraGold

Olio Capitale: Finalist, Intense

Fattoria Ramerino Primus Extra Virgin Olive Oil

BIOL, ExtraGold

Los Angeles: Gold Medal

Fattoria Ramerino Dulcis  Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Los Angeles: Gold Medal

Fattoria Ramerino Cultivar Frantoio Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Los Angeles:  Marco Mugelli Prize, Best of Show, Best of Class, Gold Medal

Fattoria Ramerino Cultivar Moraiolo Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Los Angeles: Gold Medal

Fonte di Foiano “1979”

Los Angeles: Gold Medal

Frantoi Cutrera Primo DOP

BIOL, ExtraGold

NYIOOC: Gold, Robust, Tonda Iblei

Los Angeles: Bronze Medal

Fratelli Colletti Extra Virgin Olive Oil

NYIOOC: Gold, Robust, Biancolilla

Los Angeles: Silver Medal

Frescobaldi Laudemio

Los Angeles: Bronze Medal

Gianfranco Becchina Olio Verde

NYIOOC: Silver, Medium, Nocellara del Belice

La Poderina Toscana Oro DOP Seggianese

BIOL, Gold

La Poderina Toscana Argento

BIOL, Gold

Marfuga L’affiorante

BIOL, Gold

Ascolana, Azienda del Carmine

Los Angeles: Gold Medal, Best of Class

Olio Librandi Nocellara del Belice (Tenute Librandi Pasquale)

BIOL, ExtraGold, 1* BIOL Calabria

Quattrociocchi Olivastro

BIOL, Gold

NYIOOC: Gold, Medium, Itrana

SOL: Bronze, Organic

Tenuta di Capezzana

NYIOOC: Gold, Medium

Titone DOP Extra Virgin Olive Oil

BIOL, ExtraGold

NYIOOC: Silver, Medium

Villa Zottopera (BIO sold out 6/24/14)

Los Angeles: Gold Medal

Don’t miss out! Some of these are already in short supply at Olio2go.

Olio2go:  Internet Purveyor of Italy’s Finest

OliveOilTimesCover

Celebrating our 15th year of selling Italy’s authentic olive oils to discerning consumers! We’re thrilled to have been interviewed by the Olive Oil Times for our role in bringing authentic Italian extra virgin olive oil to the U.S.

Here’s our mini FAQ:

Olive Oil: The juice pressed from fresh olives. The quality is depends on the ripeness and condition of the olives at the time of pressing. Olives that are just ripening and have no bad fruit, when crushed promptly, produce the highest quality olive oil, extra virgin.

Extra Virgin Olive Oil: Acidity level below 0.80% and a professional organoleptic taste test indicating no faults. This is the best quality of olive oil, and those with the lowest acidity levels are considered Super Premium.

Olive Oil Benefits: Many of the known and researched benefits of olive oil are tied to the Mediterranean Diet and issues related to Inflammation (The Zone Diet). The FDA allows a health claim to be included on the labels of olive oils.

Italian Olive Oil: We’re passionate about Italian olive oils because of the craftsmanship and care – and centuries of traditions. To us, others are fine, but Italian olive oils are the best. While any olive oil bottled in Italy can carry the Product of Italy label, we work with carefully selected producers to ensure authentic production and quality.

Crush Dates and Labels: It is important to read an olive oil label, but we recommend that you read it carefully and with thought. A Tuscan olive oil will simply be labeled as Raccolto 2013, because Tuscan olives are only harvested between late October and early December each year (with slight variations for weather conditions). You may also be interested to learn more about organic certification and labeling for olive oil.

How do Italian Extra Virgin Olive Oils Differ? Northern olive oils tend to be exquisite and less intense than those from other regions. Tuscan selections tend to be intense and flavorful and peppery; those from Umbria are slightly rounder than the Tuscans in flavor. Those from Lazio (the region of Rome) bring forth essences of green, while those from Puglia (the heel of the boot) finish with a strong pepper kick. The extra virgin olive oil selections from Sicily are grassy and some offer elements of tomato. There are many differences, but that’s the quick list of characteristics.

Cooking with olive oil: This is a favorite topic and we look at it simply. The producers do not buy olive oil to cook with. They use what they have carefully nurtured and crafted. A home, we keep 2-3 bottles in the cool, dark cupboard and choose the bottle with the least if we need a couple of tablespoons to roast vegetables or sauté chicken cutlets.

How to Store Olive Oil: In a cool, dark place. We do not recommend a refrigerator as some may get too cold. (And the refrigerator test is not valid).

For more information on quality extra virgin olive oil, we recommend the Olio2go Olive Oil FAQ and this piece on the Anatomy of a Great (Olive Oil) Label.

Sign up for our email list to stay up to date on new olive oil arrivals and the latest in olive oil news.

 

Zeppole (credit Maria Gagliano, Open Salon)

March is a month of change and hope, hope and change.

Whether we’re talking about the weather (“in like a lion, out like a lamb”), the Ides of March (a turning point in Italian history), St. Patrick’s Day (ridding the island of snakes) or St. Joseph’s Day (saving Sicily from  famine), the events of March are about change and hope for better times.

Growing up in a community that had two Catholic Churches (one Italian and one Irish), early on I understood that these feasts were celebrated by cultural communities. Everyone wants to be Irish on St. Patrick’s Day (March 17) to wear green, and to enjoy green beer, parades, and parties (and a respite from Lent).

In many communities, St. Joseph needs a new PR agent—to boost things up a bit or for international parity. Just two days after St. Patrick’s Day, St. Joseph is recognized with his feast day on March 19, Festa della San Giuseppe, that reaches the level of Father’s Day in Italy. Wear red, come together with the community, dine on Minestrone and Fava Beans, and enjoy special sweet treats.

Legend has it that St. Patrick drove the snakes out of Ireland. St. Joseph’s credit is due for saving the Sicilians from famine during the Middle Ages. So, the Italians also get a festival day during Lent. In Italy, entire villages come together for a feast.

Enjoy these sweet recipes for your St. Joseph’s Day traditions:

Sfinge (many spellings!)

– Remember the Italian Catholic parish mentioned in the beginning of this article? You can find the recipe from my home parish cookbook, posted online here.

Zeppole: a style of Italian doughnuts, fried, dusted with sugar, cinnamon, and honey—or filled with a yellow cream

– Rosetta Constantino’s Southern Italian Desserts  includes a recipe for Zeppole, with a variation for Sfinge. You can see the recipe for Zeppole di San Giuseppe here on One for the Table.

Pignolatta or Struffoli: reminiscent of the seeds of a pine cone, think of little friend pastry balls, and covered in honey, nuts, or chocolate

– See recipe and photo here at Roxana’s Home Baking.

Cannoli – pastry tubes filled with a creamy mixture, often made with Ricotta. We recommend a blend of Ricotta and Crèma di Pistacchio DOP Bronte! If you have cannoli shells, use this filling or start a new tradition with the recipe.

Enjoy the festivals of March. Be sure to celebrate the new season!

PistacchioPicStitch

Pistacchio Ricotta Cream Puffs

This  is a recipe crafted by necessity. The filling is magical in Cannoli, but we had no Cannoli Shells, and no time to make them. These mini pastry shells are available in in the freezer aisle at the grocery store. 

Bake puffs according to package directions. While puffs are baking, grate 1 Tablespoon of chocolate and set aside. Chop or break remaining chocolate in 24 small pieces to fit in the center of each small cup.

Remove puffs from oven. Working with puffs on the baking sheet, push centers in, and insert a piece of chocolate while puffs are still hot. Let cool 10 minutes before filling.

In a bowl stir together 1/2-3/4 cups each of Crema di Pistacchio and Ricotta. Gently spoon mixture into the pastry cups. Dust tops with grated chocolate. Place on a decorative serving platter.

Best kept at room temperature and served within three hours. If refrigerated, place on a warmed platter 20 minutes before serving.

Jan2014Large

We love it when visitors come into our shop in Fairfax, Virginia. First time visitors are inquisitive about the differences from the “extra virgin” olive oil they know and use every day (the common grocery store type). For a distinct experience, we provide a first taste of an intense, robust selection, most often from Tuscany or Umbria. Cough, cough.

Immediately, they grasp: there’s something better than the olive oil they have purchased elsewhere. True, authentic, artisan-produced extra virgin olive oil from Italy. (Yes, we are all about Italy).

Our online customers have already become fans of great olive oil. They’ve been buying the good stuff for almost 14 years!

What are the characteristics of fresh olive oil?

Zingy, layered aromas, and distinct flavors. Some possess aromas of fresh leaves, such as crushed olive leaves, or the scent of tomatoes leaves as you brush by them in the garden. Others exhibit the rich fruity smell of an orchard or fruit market. Sicilian oils in particular bring forth grassy aromas, and others may note herbaceous scents.

Take a taste. Does your olive oil evoke symphonies of flavors — a melange of artichoke, tomato, herbs, and grassy notes? Notes of apple, bananas, almonds, walnuts or flowers may come forth. Next comes the finish. It may be pungent and peppery (insert cough here) or milder and buttery–and still full of flavor.

How is fresh olive oil made?

Top quality extra virgin olive oils are harvested from just-ripening fruit. The olive fruits release relatively small amounts of oil at this early stage, but they are bursting with the healthy chemical properties many are seeking. The olives are picked when young, and bruised fruit are discarded. They are pressed within mere hours of picking, in carefully controlled conditions. (Those same trees, if picked weeks later, would yield significantly more oil, but it would be of lower quality, and likely sold in a mass market operation).

Why are there so many extra virgin olive oil labels at Olio2go?

Just as there are many wine selections to pair with food, there are many olive oil matches. If you know wine, you know that the grape varieties, micro-climate, year of harvest, and the winemaker’s skill make a great difference. There are significant parallels in the world of olive oil. (And, many Italian wine makers also produce excellent olive oil). Whether you are purchasing a Tuscan olive oil for your grilled steak, or a Calabrian for your grilled vegetables, or a Sicilian for your fennel salad, the pairings will be perfectly matched.

What else should I know? 

By tradition, some producers decant, while others bottle quickly after harvest. Early bottlings are most often unfiltered, yielding oils that appear cloudy or even milky. Some producers label their first bottles as Novello, meaning new oil. Whether labeled or not, all extra virgin olive oil, promptly pressed, bottled, and (first) released is Novello.

Just as there are many wine competitions with producers striving for top quality recognitions, there are important olive oil competitions and awards.

Does olive oil get better with age? 

No! All olive oil will degrade in time. If you start with a top quality olive oil, store it well, and use it promptly once opened you will best enjoy this culinary magic. Some varieties of olives yield oils that last longer than others. Selections crafted from Frantoio olives (known best as a Tuscan variety) and Moraiolo olives (known best as an Umbrian variety) are among those with the best lasting power.

As an olive oil ages, those distinct flavor characteristics fade. In time, the olive oil will taste flat and fatty–and eventually rancid.

Our goal is to sell the current harvest olive oil as soon as it is available — and to sell out long before the “best by” date.

What should I know about olive oil storage? 

Extra virgin olive oil is best kept in a cool, dark place. The selections on our shelves are for show. We prefer to “pull” your oil from our cool, low-light, temperature-controlled warehouse, where the oils has been kept in the dark, in shipping cartons.

Where can I learn more about great olive oil?

Click these links for more information on the anatomy of a great label, authenticity, organic certifications, and the most recent olive oil awards.

How can I purchase great olive oil?

You can purchase online at Olio2go. There’s no minimum purchase and we offer a 10% case discount on six or more. Orders are shipped promptly! If you would like auto-shipping or an Olive Oil Club, please complete the form below to provide your address and budget. We will respond via email.